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Home  >  Peer Work
Wild Cats
By M. Brooke
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: Student Examples

One day after school, I came home to a surprise. While I was at school, my dad had gone into our shed and made a wonderful discovery! He had found wild cats! There was a wild mom cat and some little wild kittens. The wild mom had kittens in our shed! He said they were only little blurs because when he'd opened the shed door, they ran for cover. He guessed there might be six.

For the next few hours we tried to catch them, but we failed. Then the next day while I was at school, my mom succeeded in capturing the babies. When I got home, my parents and sisters were gone. My brother, Mike, was the only one home. When I reached the upstairs living room, I saw our little airbed propped up in the kitchen entrance, blocking it.

I asked him why the airbed was blocking the entrance to the kitchen. He replied that Mom caught the wild kittens and was keeping them the bathroom downstairs. One of the kittens got loose and ran upstairs into the kitchen and under the stove. I asked him how many there were. He said there were only four, two black and two like the mom, gray with brown-gray stripes.

I then flew down the stairs to the bathroom. I gently opened the bathroom door and slipped inside. Mike caught up to me and said they were little devils with sharp claws and teeth. He said I could only pick a kitten up with a towel wrapped around it. When I turned on the light, three blurs headed under the toilet.

They were actually little devils. The moment I came two feet in front of them, they arched up their backs and opened their tiny mouths and hissed, shaping their tiny tongue into a U shape. They scared me out of my wits. Mike proceeded toward the vicious animals. He grabbed a towel and quickly, but gently, grabbed a kitten. A few hours later, the other striped kitten came out of its hiding place and we placed it with the others.

For the next few days I would get home from school and race down the stairs to the downstairs bathroom. We named the kittens and had a friend come over and tell us whether they were boys or girls. There were two girls and two boys, one of each color. We named the black girl Ebony (because she was very sweet and was black), and the black boy Salem (because he was mischievous and wild). We named the striped girl Lucky (because she was the one under the stove), and the striped boy Tiger (because he would scratch everyone).

I became attached to Ebony. Then one school morning a couple days later, we caught the mom overnight because we had set a trap. We then slipped the babies in the cage with her. I went off to school hoping the day would go by very fast. When school finally ended, I got on the bus and time sailed by. When the bus reached my stop, I flew from it and ran all the way home. When I got home, I ran to the garage and the cats were gone. Mike told me that Mom took them to the Humane Society so they could find good homes. I was sad that Ebony was gone, but I got to visit her the next day and the kittens were happy. Now that I had said good-bye, I could stop feeling sad.


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