sidebar
Logo Top Banner
Home
slogan Alaska Timeline Alaska Kids About
Peer Work
Family & Community
History & Culture
Digital Archives
Narrative & Healing
Reading & Writing
Libraries & Booksellers
Teaching & Learning
Contact Us

  
Search Peer Work Only
Sign up for newsletter
  
Find us on Facebook
   ENews
   April 2011 E-News
March 2011 E-News
January 2011 E-News
September 2010 E-News
May 2010 E-News
March 2010 E-News
January 2010 E-News
November 2009 E-News
September 2009 E-News


Home  >  Peer Work
Brown Bear and Kaopu
By David Jung
Genre: Visual Arts Level: Elementary 4-6
Category: Student Examples

David Jung's maskThere was a boy named Kaopu. He lived on the coast of the north with his father, mother and uncle. Kaopu was lazy. While the rest of the family was hardworking and made their best effort, he didn't.

In the summer they went to the tundra and had a hunt, while Kaopu was collecting stones for fun. His father, mother and uncle killed many caribou. Then they noticed that Kaopu was missing. They searched and called his name. They failed to find him, so they gathered up the food and went home.

Meanwhile, Kaopu was exploring a cave when he encountered a brown bear spirit. It said, "I have been watching you. My little brother, black bear, told me about you. So you are going to work from sunrise to sunset for me."

Kaopu was shocked. For the whole day, he worked as hard as he could. He caught fish and killed birds. He collected wild raspberries, blueberries and blackberries. He felt hungry, so he ate one bite of each animal and one berry of each kind.

Kaopu took the food to Brown Bear Spirit. He gave them to the real brown bears. They said, "Oh, Brown Bear Spirit, help us gather food so we may give you a body."

The spirit said, "Here is the food you asked for. Since I helped you, you shall help me."

Then there was a flash of light. Then, where the spirit had been standing, was a real brown bear. He said to Kaopu, "Rest now and when you wake up, follow the bear tracks and they will lead you home."

Kaopu slept until sunset. He went home by following the bear prints. When he got home, his parents and uncle were relieved. From then on, Kaopu worked as hard as he could. Whenever he killed an animal, he would leave part of it at the cave where he and the Brown Bear Spirit met.

The End


Related Articles
»
We Make Masks!

 
About the Author: David Jung attends Willard Bowman Optional Elementary School in Anchorage, AK.
 

sidebar
  Contact Us       LitSite Alaska, Copyright © 2000 - 2014. All rights reserved. University of Alaska Anchorage.
University of Alaska Anchorage