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Digital Archives

Home  >  Digital Archives  >  People of the North  >  Native Peoples
Alaska’s first people may be characterized as Indian, Eskimo, and Aleut, but it doesn’t stop there. At least eight distinct Native people groups exist, each with a unique history and individual cultural expression. And each has survived centuries of interaction with outsiders.
Alaska's First People (2 pages)
Alaska has been populated by 11 separate Native cultures.


Aleut (Unangan)
For thousands of years, the Aleut people, or Unangan, have occupied the Aleutian Island chain.


Alutiiq
The Alutiiq language structure and many cultural practices are similar to those of Yup'ik and Iñupiaq people.


Athabascan
The Athabascan people of Alaska's great Interior traveled and hunted seasonally in small groups.


Eyak
The Eyak people were the smallest in number among Alaska's Native groups.


Haida
The Kaigani Haida (Alaskan Haida) people inhabit the southern half of Prince of Wales Island.


The Han Athabascans (2 pages)
In Alaska, the Han people were the first recorded inhabitants of the region surrounding the easternmost stretch of the Yukon River.


Iñupiat
The Iñupiat people live along the northern and northwestern regions of Alaska.


Siberian Yupik
Although "Yupik" is part of their name, their culture, history and language are not shared by the Yup'ik / Cup'ik people.


Tlingit
The major Native group in Southeast Alaska is Tlingit.


Tsimshian
Compared to other Native Alaskans, the Tsimshian are relative newcomers.


Yup'ik / Cup'ik
The Eskimos of western and southwestern Alaska live in many villages, most of them along the great rivers and the coastline.



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