sidebar
Logo Top Banner
Home
slogan Alaska Timeline Alaska Kids About
Peer Work
Family & Community
History & Culture
Digital Archives
Narrative & Healing
Reading & Writing
Libraries & Booksellers
Teaching & Learning
Contact Us

  
Sign up for newsletter
  
Find us on Facebook
   ENews
   April 2011 E-News
March 2011 E-News
January 2011 E-News
September 2010 E-News
May 2010 E-News
March 2010 E-News
January 2010 E-News
November 2009 E-News
September 2009 E-News

Peer Work

Home  >  Peer Work
Heather's letter to Anne Frank
By Heather Olson
Genre: Non-fiction Level: Junior 7-9
Year: 1999 Category: Letters About Literature

Dear Anne Frank,

After reading your diary, I have been deeply moved. Hi, my name is Heather. I'm in the seventh grade at Colony Middle School in Palmer, Alaska. I have recently finished this book.

Before I thought the Holocaust was hideous, but now it seems even more tragic because I have heard your story. I can't understand how the Germans could be so cruel. For one race to think they are superior and act on that thought with ethnic cleansing is morally wrong. So many innocent people died. It was horrible.

Your bravery astonishes me. Being moved from your normal and comfortable life at thirteen without being able to say good-bye to those you care about had to be heart breaking. Never being able to let my friends know where I was and if I was okay would have torn me apart. To have to share a bed with an older male stranger would have scared me to death. And being confined to a very small living space where you couldn't move because you might make too much noise would be very difficult for me because I love to talk. To me you are extremely brave.

I feel very ashamed of my greed. I take advantage of the beauty that surrounds me. I'm a picky eater too. Many countries around the world are not as lucky as the United States of America.

Being right in the middle of a war must have been horrendous. I believe my head would tremble each time planes flew around. It was probably a very happy day in the "Secret Annexe" when everyone heard about the D-Day invasion. You obviously felt like you lost a friend when the town clock didn't sound.

Now I'm going to ask some questions. First, since you diary ends before the members of the "Secret Annexe" get captured by the Gestapo, how did you feel when that happened? Did you put up a fight or did you go willingly in body, but not in soul? Did you regret taking for granted your earlier (before hiding) life? While you were in hiding did you wear the yellow Star of David? Before hiding, when the Nazi said you had to wear it how did you feel? Did you ever wish you could have stayed home to be with your friends even though you would have most likely been captured sooner than you did? Did you ever wish you had a different religion so you could have avoided the tiresome life of a "fugitive"? If you ever did make it out of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp after the war what would you have done? Would you still have lived in Holland? Could you ever forgive Adolf Hitler and the other Nazi for their wretched deeds" Finally, are you glad that your diary has become famous? If hope you are because I feel it changed my and others' lives.

Sincerely,

Heather Olson
7th grade
Colony Middle School, Palmer
Teacher: Mr. Nolting

Additional comment by Heather

Hi, I'm Heather. I am in seventh grade at Colony Middle School in Palmer. I like to play soccer and basketball, read, and write. Two of my favorite activities are acting and singing.


sidebar
  Contact Us       LitSite Alaska, Copyright © 2000 - 2014. All rights reserved. University of Alaska Anchorage.
University of Alaska Anchorage